Very Fast Frame Rate Video Returns to TV

“Time Warp,” a program that originally aired on Discovery Channel in 2008 is now returning this week on The Science Channel.

By Cliff Roth

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Video/Imaging DesignWire
(3/2/2010 8:10:48 PM)

“Time Warp,” a program that originally aired on Discovery Channel in 2008 is now returning this week on The Science Channel, beginning Saturday at 8:00 pm. The program is an unabashed celebration and exposition of very high frame rate video. In fact, that’s the premise of the program — watching things that normally happen quickly in slow motion.
High frame rate video has advanced remarkably in recent years, with cameras commonly running upwards of 10,000 frames per second. This technology enables amazing views of quick-occurring events, such as watching what happens at the precise moment when a pane of glass shatters.

I’ve seen feature-length films, most notably “Koyaanisqatsi” that make extensive use of time-lapse photography, which is the opposite of high frame video and makes things appear speeded up. To my knowledge, though, Time Warp is the first and only time that an entire program has been built around high-speed cameras.

In the first episode, Time Warp cameras capture the force of a Kun Tao master breaking stone slabs, mad scientists take the backyard trick of creating Diet Coke and Mentos geysers to astounding new heights, and a frisbee dog shows off her acrobatic skills in super slow motion.

In the second installment, the Time Warp team’s cameras capture the magic of juggling — from balls to running chainsaws. The team then puts all sorts of things you really shouldn’t in a blender…like butane lighters. And they break a beer bottle with only their hands.

In the third episode the Time Warp cameras discover what happens when you’re hit by a taser gun, how a pole vaulter defies gravity for a record-making jump, and how a jack hammer pounds the pavement…and the body.

For additional show times, see The Science Channel.



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