PC Video and USB 2.0 Multiplexing over 802.11n for “PC-on-TV” Functionality

ExtremeLink PC-on-TV technology offers the transmission of high quality video and USB 2.0 to deliver all types of PC interactions wirelessly over 802.11n including the ability to browse the Internet, access email, instant message, create documents, stream content off of a flash drive, play games, and much more.

By Erin Martin-Serrano, Icron Technologies

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Video/Imaging DesignWire
(6/1/2010 4:19:32 PM)

Demand for adding PC-like functionality to the TV is increasing.  Icron Technologies has developed ExtremeLink technology to deliver high quality video and USB 2.0 to TVs wirelessly. Many technology platforms offer video streaming and a subset of other PC functionality to a standard television. What ExtremeLink PC-on-TV technology offers is the transmission of high quality video and USB 2.0 to deliver all types of PC interactions wirelessly over 802.11n including the ability to browse the Internet, access email, instant message, create documents, stream content off of a flash drive, play games, and much more.

In the PC-on-TV architecture, shown in figure 1, the PC video and audio is presented to the user’s TV or monitor without disturbing any of the existing A/V sources (e.g. cable-TV source, DVD, etc.) connected to the TV.  The PC DVI or HDMI output and USB connection is connected to the PC Extender.  The PC extender transmits both video and USB 2.0 wirelessly over 802.11n.  Then, the TV or Monitor Extender receives the transmission and decodes the video and USB 2.0 sending DVI or HDMI to a remote TV or monitor and enabling connection of any USB 2.0 device.  In this article, we will examine the PC-on-TV architecture and the three challenges of combining high definition real time PC video with latency sensitive USB 2.0 and transmitting it wirelessly; these challenges are transmitting video, transmitting USB 2.0 and multiplexing video and USB together.

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Figure 1. PC-on-TV Architecture
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When transmitting video, maintaining video quality within the bandwidth limitation is critical.  Video quality is of high importance since artifacts are magnified on large TVs or monitors and may be unacceptable.  For bandwidth, it determines if a semi compressed, compressed video, or uncompressed video can be utilized.  Uncompressed HD video can take Gigabits of bandwidth for transmission.  Over Cat 5 cable, this is possible but certainly not wirelessly.  For a typical home to have reliable connectivity, the wireless bandwidth is limited to 20Mbps.
NEXT: H.264 Compression

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